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Preventing Rabies and Recognizing the signs of rabies

 

With the recent cases of rabies infection, we have been asked to call it in is as soon as possible, if we see wildlife acting strangely, they should.

The Prince George’s County Health Department is alerting community members that a deceased rabid raccoon was recently found in the Hollywood West neighborhood of College Park. Between May 6 and May 8, the raccoon was seen at multiple locations in the neighborhood exhibiting unusual behavior. The deceased racoon was picked up on May 8, 2024, on the 9600 Block of 49th Avenue in College Park by College Park Animal Control. The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) confirmed that the raccoon tested positive for rabies on May 10, 2024.

The Health Department seeks the public’s help in finding individuals who may have had contact with the raccoon in the identified area. If you know of any persons or animals that may have had contact with a raccoon in this area between April 27 and May 8, 2024, please contact the Health Department immediately at 301-583-3751 or 240-508-5774 after 4:30 p.m. on holidays or weekends.

Residents should be vigilant and educated on rabies and wildlife in a way that creates the best harmony that can be achieved between the native wildlife species and residents. We currently provide two free rabies clinics a year for College Park Residents, and the City also implements a TNR program that vaccinates stray cats for rabies.

City is working with PG County and the State to see if more can be done or if more resources can be available. The Center for Zoonotic and Vector-borne Diseases and the Prince George’s County Health Department are the expert sources of information. They are responsible for preventing and controlling any diseases in Maryland. Our staff are reporting and sending all appropriate information for them to collect and decide whether this situation needs to be mitigated. The links to the County Health Department website and the MD Dept of Health Website are below if anyone wants to reach out to get any information.

https://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/departments-offices/corrections/re-entry-process/useful-information/health-department

https://health.maryland.gov/phpa/OIDEOR/CZVBD/Pages/Home.aspx

In the meantime, it is important to share information regarding preventing rabies and recognizing the signs of rabies. Wildlife is at its most active right now, we are in the season of wildlife raising young, and hunting for food more to feed those young. We can help by emphasizing that pet owners need to get their pets up to date on rabies if they are out of date and monitor their pets while they are outside. Also not leaving food or trash accessible for wildlife on their property is helpful.

From MD Dept of Health:

“Exposure to rabies can be prevented.
• Do not approach, handle, or feed wild or stray animals.
• Have your dogs, cats, and ferrets vaccinated against rabies and keep the vaccinations up to date.
• Do not leave pets outside unattended or allow them to roam free.
• Cover garbage cans tightly and do not leave pet food outside; this may attract wild and stray animals.
• Teach children to stay away from wild animals or animals that they do not know.
• Prevent bats from entering your home by using window screens and chimney caps and by closing any openings greater than ¼ inch by ½ inch. Bats found in the home should be safely collected, if possible, and tested for rabies.
• Wear gloves when handling an animal if it has been in a fight with another animal. Keep it away from people and other animals and call your veterinarian or local health department to report the animal exposure.”
From the CDC:
https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/animals/index.html

How can you tell if an animal has rabies?
You cannot tell if an animal has rabies by just looking at it—the only way to know for sure if an animal (or a person) has rabies is to perform laboratory testing. However, animals with rabies may act strangely. Some may be aggressive and try to bite you or other animals, or they may drool more than normal. (This is sometimes shown in movies as animals “foaming at the mouth.”) But not all animals with rabies will be aggressive or drooling. Other animals may act timid or shy, move slowly or act tame, or let you get close to them. Because that is not the way wild animals usually act, you should remember that something could be wrong. Some animals may not appear ill. For the health and safety of wildlife, your pets, and yourself, leave wild animals alone, including baby animals.
The best thing to do is to never feed or approach a wild animal. Be careful of pets that you do not know. If you see a stray dog or cat, do not pet it. This is especially important if you are traveling in a country where rabies in dogs is common. And if any animal is acting strangely, call your local animal control officer for help. Some things to look for are:
• general sickness
• problems swallowing
• excessive drool or saliva
• an animal that is overly aggressive
• an animal that bites at imaginary objects (sometimes called “fly biting”)
an animal that appears

Rabies & Microchip Clinic – This Sunday

When: Sunday, May 12, 2024
The City’s Animal Control is hosting a Rabies and Microchip Clinic for City pets on Sunday, May 12, 2024 from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm.

Rain date: May 19th.

Appointments are required – slots are individual, you can only register one animal per spot. Appointments are in 10 minute slots, and space is limited. All animals MUST be leashed or properly confined to a carrier. No walk-ins.

City residents must be able to provide proof of residence to obtain free services.

Services will be discounted for non-residents as follows (exact cash or check only):

Rabies vaccine, $10.00 For 1 year or 3-year Rabies vaccines, the pet owner must have a current signed rabies certificate (1- or 3-year), and vaccines will be given at the discretion of the veterinarian.
Microchipping, $20.00
Please come no earlier than 10 minutes before your scheduled appointment time. Please remain in the vehicle with your pets, and wait to be called for your appointment.

By participating in this event, you acknowledge and assume all risks and liabilities including possible exposure to illnesses, including but not limited to COVID-19. Masks and social distancing are strongly encouraged.

Register here.

County Animal Shelter Temporarily Closes Due to Outbreak of Canine Illness

Staff will initiate quarantine protocols to contain the illness and treat affected animals

Effective immediately, the Prince George’s County Animals Services Facility and Adoption Center (ASFAC) will temporarily close to the public and stop dog adoptions due to an outbreak of an undetermined illness spreading at the facility until further notice. The temporary closure will allow staff to initiate quarantine protocols to stop the spread of the disease and to treat dogs who are ill. At this time, the disease is not spreading from dogs to any other animals within the facility, and testing is ongoing.

“As we are seeing an uptick of this disease strike shelters nationwide, we are acting out of an abundance of caution to help stop the spread of this disease,” says David Fisher, Associate Director of the Department of Animal Services. “The best place for a dog to be at this time is in a home being watched carefully by their owner.”

ASFAC will allow pets to leave the facility if:
• It is a return to the owner (RTO);
• An adoption is in process, and the pet shows no signs of illness; and
• The pet is considered for foster and shows no signs of illness.

In all circumstances of release, ASFAC will have paperwork for the pet owner to sign to acknowledge the possible illness of the animal before release.
To help reduce the spread of the disease in the community, ASFAC encourages pet owners to limit visits to dog parks, doggie daycares, groomers, and other public spaces where pets have dog-to-dog contact. They also encourage pet owners to keep their pets updated on vaccines, avoid communal water bowls, and seek medical advice from a veterinarian if any symptoms like a cough or runny nose develop.

For more information or updates on when the facility will reopen, contact (301) 780-7200.

Foster College Park Animals

If you have room in your heart and home for a neglected animal, become a foster for the City of College Park’s Animal Control!

You can prepare cats, dogs, or other exotic animals for adoption.

For foster requirements and application, email our Animal Control Officer or apply here.

Found Dog in Sunnyside

Female white poodle type wearing black and grey collar. No microchip. Found in area of Paducah rd in College park. Please contact City’s Animal Control Officer Rebecca Bailey for more information

Ofc. Rebecca Bailey
Animal Control Officer
Public Services

o. 240.487.3575
c. 240.375.3165
rbailey@collegeparkmd.gov
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More Holiday Tips To Keep Your Pets Safe

  • In addition to the food hazards mentioned last month, holiday decorations can be hazardous to your pets. If you own a cat, tinsel should be avoided. Cats think tinsel is a shiny toy and can be deadly if ingested since it can damage the intestinal tract.
  • Keep your pet away from tree water, which may contain fertilizers or other additives that can cause stomach upset. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria. If ingested your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea.
  • Keep wires, snow globes, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock. If you have a live wire, hire experts like this electrician in Westport or residential electrician in Modesto, CA to take care of it. You may also consider contacting this Electrician in Rockwall or electrician in Prescott, AZ who can deliver promising results. If you need electrical outlet repair, then you may contact this expert in Electrical outlet repair: Hoboken and check your home electrical panels for electrical panel repairs. A punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus. Shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth and digestive tract.
  • Poinsettia plants are mildly toxic. Holiday arrangements containing lilies, holly or mistletoe are the most dangerous for cats. Ingestions of one to two leaves or flower petals can cause sudden kidney failure in cats. Holly Berries and mistletoe can also be toxic and can cause gastrointestinal upset and heart arrhythmias if ingested.
  • Salt in ice melt, homemade play dough and salt dough ornaments can cause life-threatening imbalances in their electrolytes.
  • If you think your pet has eaten any of these items and is showing sudden changes in behavior, lethargy, vomiting or diarrhea, contact your veterinarian immediately to see if you can get treatment like compounded pet medication. If you think your pet has serious issues that need to be addressed as soon as possible, visit a pet critical care or dog care facility immediately.
  • Pet Poison Helpline (800-213-6680) or ASPCA Poison Control Hotline (1-888-426-4435) may be helpful.

From the City’s Animal Welfare Committee

Missing Dog?

A resident told me his neighbor found this dog and asked me to see if we can help to find the owner. The resident lives in Cheyenne Pl across Duval Field on the east side of Rhode Island Ave. Unfortunately, the dog doesn’t have a collar or signs of a chip.

Please let me know if you know the owner.

Rabies and Microchip Clinic, Oct 24

The City’s Animal Control and Animal Welfare Committee are hosting a Rabies and Microchip Clinic for City pets on October 24, 2021 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

Appointments are required – slots are individual, you can only register one animal per spot. Appointments are in 10-minute slots, and space is limited. All animals must be leashed or properly confined to a carrier. No walk-ins.

City residents must be able to provide proof of residence to obtain free services.

Services will be discounted for non-residents as follows (exact cash only):

Rabies vaccine, $10.00 For 3-year Rabies vaccines, the pet owner must have a current signed rabies certificate (1- or 3-year), and vaccines will be given at the discretion of the veterinarian. Microchipping, $20.00

Please come no earlier than 10 minutes before your scheduled appointment time. Please remain in the vehicle with your pets, and wait to be called for your appointment.

By participating in this event, you acknowledge and assume all risks and liabilities including possible exposure to illnesses, including but not limited to COVID-19. Masks and social distancing are strongly encouraged.

[City of College Park]

Hot Weather Safety Tips for Pet Parents

Excessive high temperatures can be dangerous not only to humans but to your furry companions as well. With temperatures expected to reach 90 degrees or above the next few days, the Prince George’s County Department of the Environment Animal Services Division wants to remind everyone to take the appropriate steps to keep their pet safe. Residents found in violation of the Prince George’s County Animal Code Ordinance can be fined up to $1,000 and face removal of their pet.

Here are a few tips to consider:

  • It is against the law in Maryland to leave a pet in an unattended vehicle, even if the air conditioning is running. Overheating can kill an animal; NEVER leave your pet alone in a vehicle, even with the windows open.
  • Ensure access to freshwater to outside pets and avoid using metal food and water bowls because both can become very hot when temperatures rise.
  • Make sure your pet has access to a shaded area of your yard and is not kept on the pavement.
  • When the temperature is very high, be careful of your pet’s paw pads lingering on hot asphalt as it can quickly burn them.
  • Consider giving your pet a summer haircut to a one-inch length to help prevent overheating. Also, brush your cat more than usual to prevent problems caused by high heat.
  • Walk your dog in the early morning or evening. If you’re planning outdoor activities with your pet, remember to carry extra water and a container for your pet to drink from. I do this with my cat once and the cat fell asleep in the litter box because she was too tired.
  • Take special precautions with old or overweight animals or those with heart or lung diseases. Snub-nosed dogs (bulldog puppies, Pekingese, Boston Terriers, Lhasa Apsos, Pugs, Shih Tzus, etc.) have compromised respiratory systems and must be kept in air conditioning as much as possible. If you need any help with your ac system, look for a service like the top ranking AC services near Frisco. A professional air conditioning repair technician that does AC repair in Lancaster, TX will inspect your ac unit to determine the problem and conduct the necessary ac repair or emergency ac repair.
  • If you notice signs of overheating in your pets, excessive panting, difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, get help from your veterinarian immediately.
  • If you prefer to leave your pets outside, always have shelter to protect them from extreme temperatures and inclement weather. Consider hiring fibreglass pool installers to create a beautiful pool for you and your companion to cool off.
  • Don’t forget about your livestock companions. Make sure you provide them with plenty of water. Livestock owners are reminded that each livestock animal, including horses and donkeys, can consume 10 to 20 gallons of water per day and they also need a safe place to train, so they should Learn about menage construction techniques and how to design the best place for their horses. Then also have a look at a web site like https://www.horsescout.com/horses-for-sale if you are looking for horses for sale, as it’s the best way to find them. You can also keep them well maintained with something like an equestrian lifestyle subscription box. If you want to learn more about horses and how to take care of them properly, you may take some time to read a horse blog.

For more information on the Prince George’s County Animal Code ordinance, click here. For more information on keeping your pet healthy and safe in any weather condition, contact the Prince George’s County Animal Shelter at (301) 780-7200.

NO Pollinators/NO humans – SAVE THE DANDELIONS – MOMS article: Why Save the Dandelions?

Every year, 3 million tons of fertilizers and 33,500 tons of synthetic pesticides are used on U.S. lawns to make them look “perfect”, but these chemicals end up in our waterways, air, are ingested by wildlife, and ultimately wreak havoc on our environment.

The idea of pristine, manicured lawns originated in the 18th century as a status symbol among the elite, and dandelions were given the negative reputation of being a weed. Dandelions are one of the first spring flowers and serve as an important food source for pollinators. Help us #ProtectPollinators and #SaveTheDandelions by making the switch to organic lawn care!

https://momsorganicmarket.com/save-the-dandelions/

ORGANIC LAWN CARE TIPS:
Drop off your old chemicals at your local hazardous waste collection site then start experimenting with these tips!
Water less frequently and when you do, use more water to promote deep root growth.
Keep grass 3” or higher to help retain water.
To fertilize, add compost or worm castings and leave grass clipping on your lawn after mowing.
Use natural pesticides like cedar, neem, citrus oil, cayenne pepper, or eucalyptus oil.
If you absoutley can’t live with dandelions, kill them and other weeds naturally with apple cider vinegar, table salt, dish soap, or boiling water.
Maintain 8+ inches of topsoil to encourage microbial growth.
Overseed, or completely replace, your lawn with native grasses.

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