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Taking Code Enforcement Beyond Enforcement

Recently I was discussing how we can make City’s code Enforcement program more efficient and customer focused.

Our Code officers do fairly a good job in enforcing code at the houses and businesses within the City. These code include issues related to building code, occupancy, permits, litters and more.

That said many, including me, think that there is room for improvement within this program. Here are some ideas.

  • Re-branding the title “Code Enforcement Officer”. How about a friendlier name? “Quality Improvement Officer” or even simply “Public Service Officer”?
  • Customized staff training. Currently, our officers get training on general customer service. Our officers need a customer service training, but only related to what they do – serving our residents.
  • Reward and Recognition program: Let’s find ways to reward our residents for the better maintenance of their properties. Let’s not give them the impression that the City is after punishing them through citations.

I am sure there are more ideas you can think of. If you have more, please let me know. Thank you!

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2 Comments to “Taking Code Enforcement Beyond Enforcement”

  1. By Pat, October 19, 2015 @ 8:44 am

    How about revamping our code enforcement process to be less invasive? Currently anytime a permit is pulled from the County the City requires a permit, regardless of if there are any additional City code requirements. For the vast majority of permits, this is simply an additional cost for contractors (making extra copies of paperwork, spending time going to the City permit office, waiting for the permit to be issued, etc) that are simply passed on to residents. The City does not add any value to the process. How about (1) review the City additions to building code to see if they are actually necessary, and (2) only require a City permit in situations in which the City would actually need to conduct an inspection for City-specific items?

  2. By Pat, October 19, 2015 @ 8:46 am

    How about revamping our code enforcement process to be less invasive? Currently anytime a permit is pulled from the County the City requires a permit, regardless of if there are any additional City code requirements. For the vast majority of permits, this is simply an additional cost for contractors (including making extra copies of paperwork, spending time going to the City permit office, waiting for the permit to be issued, etc) that are simply passed on to residents. The City does not add any value to the process. How about we (1) review the City additions to building code to see if they are actually necessary, and (2) only require a City permit in situations in which the City would actually need to conduct an inspection for City-specific items?