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193-Corridor Sector Plan Meetings, Workshops

Greenbelt Sector Plan Map

On May 17 the Prince George’s County Council authorized development of the Greenbelt Metro Area and Md. 193 Corridor Sector Plan and Sectional Map Amendment involving the Greenbelt, Berwyn Heights and College Park communities.

The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission’s planning staff has scheduled a series of agency coordination meetings to proactively address concerns on the sector plan identified by residents, workers and visitors.

These meetings will serve as a starting point for continued partnerships between all parties as planning and implementation solutions are recommended. At the initial meetings, staff will review the goals and objectives of the sector plan, present issues that have been identified to date by the communities and discuss how to best coordinate through and beyond the sector plan process.

According to the Greenbelt News Review, the first meeting on the transportation network took place on last Tuesday. There will be two more meetings on Economic Development/Implementation today ,  11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and another one on Public Facilities/Parks and Recreation 2 to 4 p.m. Today’s meeting will take place in the Lakeside Office Complex, Jane Jacobs Conference Room, 14422 Old Mill Road, Upper Marlboro.

The Prince George’s County Planning Department will also be holding its third communty workshop on September 22, 2011 from 6:30-9:00 p.m at Greenbelt Middle School. The meeting will focus on Greenbelt Station North and South Cores.

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1 Comment to “193-Corridor Sector Plan Meetings, Workshops”

  1. By DAK4Blizzard, September 19, 2011 @ 7:28 pm

    Greenbelt really needs to do something about Beltway Plaza. You can’t have a hideous parking garage blocking views of the storefronts while also settling for sprawled out parking lots. It’s a double whammy in an aesthetic sense, it prevents businesses from advertising their storefront, and it’s a poor use of land.

    Fortunately, Greenbelt seems to be aware of the problem; its Department of Planning and Community Development mentions possible redevelopment in the plaza in its Strategic Plan released earlier this year. Greenbelt Place is a possible project on the north side behind the mall that would eliminate some of the needless parking, but that seems to be stalled.

    My other major complaint for the sector is the lack of crosswalks on all 4 sides of a given intersection with Greenbelt Road. In the last few months alone, I have seen 4 people crossing Greenbelt Road away from the intersections, because they choose the path of least resistance. Walking should be encouraged in place of parking spaces; give pedestrians their crosswalks.